Now that standardized testing is over, I feel like we can breath again and have some FUN! The idea that I have for you today is so much fun, that my students beg for it! All you need is a set of task cards and a children's board game. Students will play the game as usual, but before they can take their turn, they need to correctly answer the question on their task card. So easy! My favorite games to use are Candy Land and Jenga. They can be purchased for about $5 at Wal-Mart. Other good games might be Checkers, Connect 4, Trouble, Sorry or Chutes and Ladders. Don't have any board games in your classroom? How about Tic Tac Toe instead? Looking for some task cards to use for your games? I have dozens of sets of math and ELA task cards in my TpT store. Just click HERE ....
I am super excited to be a part of the Trade and Grade Blog Hop again this month! It is so much fun to get to try these new products with my students. And this month- I hit the jackpot FOR SURE. I was paired up with Arisbeth Rossi of Sailing into Second . I may have squealed when I saw that she had sent me her 3 Branches of Government Unit ! I have a degree in American Political Studies. I have worked in all three branches of the Arizona state government. It was after I had kids that I decided to go back to school to teach. I got my certificate in Secondary Education and did my student teaching in a 12th grade American Government class. I LOVED the content area. Talking about government all day was perfect for me. However, I wasn't so sure about the kids. I had small kids at home and listening to the language and attitude of teenagers, scared me a wee bit. And that is how I ended up changing directions and teaching the third grade. But, I didn't give up teaching ...
I spent a good deal of time cutting laminated task cards today. And I was happy to do so because task cards make my life simpler! My favorite way to use task cards is with a good ol' fashion scoot! Here is how I run most my scoots. I give each student a recording sheet. I pass a task card out to each student. They complete their task card and then begin scooting around the room to answer all the questions. When they are done, they return to their desk and read silently until the rest of the class finishes. When everyone is finished, I call the task cards by number. If you have that task card- you must stand up and read the card. Then the students gives their answer and explains why they chose that answer. Variations: You can have students work with partners as they scoot around the room. You can skip going over the answers at the end and grade their recording sheets as an assessment. You can put the task cards around the room. You can give students a certain amount...
Are you ready for another way to use task cards in the classroom? My students start their standardized testing this week, so we have been reviewing for the last two weeks. My students' very favorite way to review is to play Trash-ketball!!! It is the perfect game to review for any subject. All you need is some tape, a ball, a trashcan and some task cards. Divide your students into two teams. Take turns giving a task card to each team. If the student answers it correctly, they earn one point for their team. And then they get to take a shot at bonus points! I put two pieces of tape on the floor so students can decide if they want to shoot for a two pointer or a three pointer. If the student doesn't get their task card correct, then I go to the other team. This keeps all students engaged and thinking about each and every task card. My students beg for this one!  Click HERE to see my task card sets on TpT. ...
Last week, I shared many of the reasons that I like to use task cards in my classroom. Today (and for the next several weeks), I am going to share some different ways to use task cards in the classroom. With standardized testing right around the corner, my current favorite way to use my task cards is as a line up activity/assessment. I like using this strategy because it doesn't involve any prepping of recording sheets and fits into those awkward couple of minutes that you sometimes have before lunch, recess or specials. Here is how it works: I like to keep a pile of task cards on my front table. Five minutes before lunch I will get the class' attention. Then I will walk up to individual students and show them the task card (or read it to them). If they get the question right, they get to line up for lunch. If they are incorrect, you can do one of two things. You can leave the card with them to refigure. Or you can move to the next student and see if they can corr...