Quite some time ago, I wrote a blog post about how I organize my math centers and what students do at each center. It has been wildly popular. If you would like to read that post, you can do so by clicking on the picture below. Since that time, I have received many requests to write a similar post about my reading centers. I am thrilled to finally have that post written and ready to share. I hope that it gives you ideas that make your centers meaningful and simple to prepare and manage! I use the exact same schedule for my reading centers as I do for my math centers. This makes it extra easy for students to learn the routine. I am privileged to have 90 minutes for reading. I have four different reading groups that are grouped by ability level. I meet with only two of these groups per day. This may sound crazy to some of you, but it really makes the most of our time. Since I meet with only two of the groups, I am able to meet with them for 30 minutes each...
Teachers are humans. They are not infallible. They make mistakes. Even the best teachers.  And they learn from their mistakes and become better educators. So before I share the mistakes that I think many teachers make, I want to preface by saying that teaching is one of the toughest jobs on the planet. I have made most of these mistakes, and that is why I am so passionate about writing about them. Also, it is just my opinion that these are mistakes. Since every class and classroom are so different, they may not be a mistake in your classroom. In my early years teaching, I preferred to keep my students in their seats. It was actually a class rule! That seemed like good classroom management to me. But let's be real. Kids aren't made to sit still. They need to move! Some ideas for getting kids out of their seats include: Task Card Scoots Brain Breaks Centers Games Reading or Working on the Floor Alternative Seating Click on the photo below if you are looking...